Prepaid Insurance Is A Debit Or Credit

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Prepaid Insurance Is A Debit Or Credit – The time period (or periodicity) assumption is that the economic life of a business can be divided into artificial time periods—typically a month, a quarter, or a year. Courses of less than one year are called intermediate courses. A one-year accounting period is usually known as a fiscal year. 1

The principle of revenue recognition states that revenue should be recognized in the accounting period in which it is earned. In a service business, revenue is usually recognized at the time the service is performed. In a commodity trading business, revenue is usually earned at the time the goods are delivered. 2

Prepaid Insurance Is A Debit Or Credit

The act of recording expenses is referred to as the matching principle. The matching principle states that effort (cost) matches performance (revenue). The income earned this month is compensated by the expenses incurred to earn money

Solved] The Unadjusted Trial Balance Of Trendy Consulting Pty Ltd Is As…

Follows the revenue recognition principle The revenue matching principle is recorded when it is earned, not just when cash is received. Expenses that are recorded in generating revenue when services or goods are used or consumed, not just when cash is paid. GAAP

PowerPoint Slides Cash Basis of Accounting Non-GAAP revenues are recorded only when cash is received. Expenses are recorded only when cash is paid. 5

9 Adjusting Posts Adjusting entries are required every time the accounts are prepared. Adjusting entries can be classified as 1. Prepayments (advance charges or accruals), 2. Accruals (accruals or expenses), or 3. Estimates (depreciation). 5

Prepaid expenses 1. Prepaid expenses – expenses paid in cash and recorded as assets before use or consumption. 2. Unearned income – income that is received in cash and is recorded as a liability before it is earned.

Answered: Cornerstone Exercise 3 27 (algorithmic)…

Accrued Income 1. Accrued Income – Income earned but not yet received in cash or recorded. 2. Accrued expenses – expenses that have been incurred but have not yet been paid in cash or recorded.

13 Terms are prepayments or prepaid expenses or unearned revenues. Adjusting entries for prepayments are required to record the portion of the prepayment that represents 1. an expense incurred or 2. revenue earned in the current accounting period.

14 Prepaid Expenses Prepaid expenses are expenses that are paid in cash and recorded as assets before they are used or consumed. Prepaid expenses amortize over time or through usage. There is an asset-expense account relationship with prepaid expenses. 6

15 Prepaid expenses Before adjustment, assets are overvalued and expenses are undervalued. The adjusting entry results in a debit to the expense account and a credit to the asset account. Examples of prepaid expenses include utilities, rent, insurance, and property taxes. 7

Chapter 2, Problem 5pa

16. Earning income is the income that is received before earning and is recorded as debt. Then by performing a service or delivering a product to a customer, the resulting income is obtained. There is a debit-income account relationship with unearned income. 10

17 Unaccrued income Before adjustment, liabilities are overstated and income is understated. The adjusting entry results in a debit to the debit account and a credit to the income account. Examples of extracurricular income include rent, magazine subscriptions, plane tickets, and tuition.

Assets Prepaid Expenses Unadjusted Balance Credit Adjustment Entry (-) Debt Adjustment Entry Expense (+) Unearned Revenues Debt Balance Unadjusted Balance Debt Adjustment Entry (-) Credit Adjustment Entry Income (+)

Adjusting entries for accruals are necessary to record income and expenses incurred in the current period. The accrual adjustment entry increases both the balance sheet and the income statement account.

Solved Wells Technical Institute Unadjusted Trial Balance

20 Accrued Revenue Accrued revenue can accumulate over time or through services performed but not billed or collected. There is an asset-income account relationship with retained earnings. Before adjustment, assets and income are undervalued. The adjustment entry requires a debit to the asset account and a credit to the income account. Examples of accrued income include trade receivables, rent receivables, and interest receivables.

21 Accrued costs Accrued costs are costs incurred that have not yet been paid. There is a debit and expense account relationship. Prior to adjustment, liabilities and expenses are understated. The adjusting entry results in a debit to the expense account and a credit to the liability account. Examples of accrued expenses include accounts payable, rent payable, wages payable, and interest payable.

Nominal value of the annual interest rate of the note (for one year) Interest x x = $5000 x % x / 12 = $25

24 Depreciation Depreciation is the process of allocating the cost of certain fixed assets to expenses over their lifetime in a logical and systematic manner. Depreciation attempts to match the cost of a long-term capital asset with the income it generates each period.

Solution: Financial Accounting 3

25 Depreciation Depreciation is an estimate, not an actual measurement of the cost that has expired. We do not attempt to reflect the actual value change of an asset!

When recording depreciation, Depreciation Expense is debited and an opposing asset account, Accumulated Depreciation, is credited. The difference between the cost of an asset and its accumulated depreciation is called the net book value of the asset. XXX XXX Depreciation expenses Accumulated depreciation

1. Prepaid assets and overvalued assets. Assets 2. Overestimated liabilities and unearned liabilities. Income 3. Accumulated assets and undervalued assets. Income 4. Accrued expenses and understated expenses. Liabilities 5. Expenses and depreciation expenses less the estimate of Dr. Amort. Expiration vs. Assets Assets are overvalued in NOK. Accum. Depreciation Accounts Before Adjustment Type Adjustment Input Adjustment Relationship

An adjusted trial balance is prepared after all adjustments are recorded and posted. It shows the balance of all accounts at the end of the accounting period and the impact of all financial events that occurred during the period. This proves that the total debit and credit balance in the ledger is the same after all adjustments are made. Accounts can be prepared directly from the adjusted trial balance.

Chapter 5: Adjustments And The Worksheet Pages 1 23

Accounts can be prepared directly from the adjusted trial balance. 1. The profit and loss account is prepared from the income and expense account. 2. The statement of shareholders’ equity is derived from the owner’s capital and liability accounts and the net income (or net loss) shown in the profit and loss statement. 3. The balance sheet is then prepared from the asset and liability account and the owner’s final capital balance, which is reported in the statement of shareholders’ equity.

Trial Balance Trial Balance – Each account is analyzed to determine whether it is complete and up-to-date. Pioneer Advertising Agency Trial Balance October 31, 2008 Account Debit Credit Account Cash $15,200 Advertising Supplies 2,500 Prepaid Insurance 600 Office Equipment 5,000 Notes Payable $5,000 Accounts Payable 2,500 Nonearning Stock 200,000 Dividends 500 Revenue Services 10,004 0 Salary Expense 900 Expense 900 $ 28, 70,000 $ 70,000 28,700 $

Example (Insurance): On October 4, Pioneer Advertising Company paid $600 for a one-year fire insurance policy. Show the journal entry to record the payment on October 4. Mehr 4 Prepaid Insurance 600 Cash 600 Prepaid Insurance Cash Debt Credit Credit 600 600

Example (Insurance): On October 4, Pioneer Advertising Company paid $600 for a one-year fire insurance policy. Show the adjusting journal entry required on October 31. 31 Mehr insurance cost 50 prepaid insurance 50 prepaid insurance cost insurance debt credit debtor credit 600 50 50 550

What Are Prepaid Expenses? (balance Sheet Accounting + Examples)

Example (depreciation): On October 2, Pioneer Advertising paid $5,000 for office equipment that has an expected life of 10 years. Show the journal entry to record the purchase of equipment on October 2. Oct 2 Equipment 5,000 Cash 5,000 Equipment Cash Debit Debit Debit Credit 5,000 5,000 LO 5 Prepare the adjusting entries for the deferral.

Example (depreciation): On October 2, Pioneer Advertising paid $5,000 for office equipment that has an expected life of 10 years. Show the adjusting journal entry required on October 31. The value of this equipment is $200. ([$200-5,000 salvage value] / 5 years / 12 months = $40) January 31 Depreciation Expense 40 Accumulated Depreciation 40 Depreciation Expense Accumulated Depreciation Debit Credit Credit Debit 40 40 40

Depreciation (Billing) Accumulated Depreciation – is a contrarian asset account. It appears right after the account that settles on the balance sheet (equipment). Office Equipment $5,000 Less: Accumulated Depreciation – Office Equipment $4,960

Example: On October 2, Pioneer Advertising received $1,200 from R. Knox for services to be completed by December 31. Show the journal entry to record the receipt on October 2. Oct 2 Cash 1,200 Unearned Revenue 1,200 Unearned Cash Rent Revenue Debit Credit Debit Debit 1,200 1,200 LO 5 Prepare the adjusting entries for the deferral.

Solved Adjusted Trial Balance January 31 Account Title Debit

Example: On October 2, Pioneer Advertising received $1,200 from R. Knox for services to be completed by December 31. Show the journal entry required on October 31. October 31 Service income 400 Service income 400 Service income Unearned income Debit Credit Debit Credit 400 400 1, 200 800

Example: In October, Pioneer Advertising earned $200 for unregistered advertising services. Show journal entries to

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